Gold, silver highlight Colonial Acres’ busiest auction to date

All realized prices include 15 per cent buyer’s fee

This month, Colonial Acres Auctions followed up on its Spring Numismatic Sale with another strong auction drawing bidders from across the continent.

The Kitchener, Ont.-based auction house hosted its second numismatic sale of 2016 on Nov. 11-12, when more than 1,200 lots were offered across two sessions.

“In terms of activity, it was most we’ve ever had,” said auctioneer Todd Sandham, who’s also co-founder of Colonial Acres Coins. “It surpassed our May auction.”

Sandham said there was “great participation” from online bidders.

This five-coin fractional gold set issued by the Royal Canadian Mint in 2001 brought $3,421,25. (Colonial Acres photo)

This five-coin fractional gold set issued by the Royal Canadian Mint in 2001 brought $3,421,25. (Photo by Colonial Acres)

“It was amazing looking at all the bids coming in from across Canada. One minute there’s someone from New Brunswick, and the next minute you have a guy from Burnaby, B.C.,” he said, adding there were also bidders from California. “We had all of North America represented.”

HIGHLIGHTS

Among the auction’s top highlights was Lot 17, a gold Proof set featuring the iconic St. George and the Dragon design. Issued by Great Britain in 2006, the four-coin set includes denominations of £2, £5 and half- as well as full-Sovereign. Certified as Proof-69 Deep Cameo by Professional Coin Grading Service (PCGS), this set contains 2.0014 ounces of gold and realized $3,438.50.

“The gold net is around $3,000, so it went where it should go,” said Sandham. “It’s a nice set, but a grade of Proof-70 would’ve brought much more.”

Another fractional gold set, this issued by Canada in 2001, realized $3,421,25. The five-coin hologram set was Lot 54 and included a one-ounce, half-ounce, quarter-ounce, one-tenth-ounce and one-twentieth-ounce coin.

The following lot offered another Canadian five-coin set, this struck in platinum and issued in 2002. Only 500 sets were produced by the Royal Canadian Mint. This set – which includes one-ounce, half-ounce, quarter-ounce, one-tenth-ounce and one-twentieth-ounce coins – realized $2,673.50.

This 1948 silver dollar in International Coin Certification Service Mint State-63 brought $3,105.

This 1948 silver dollar in International Coin Certification Service Mint State-63 brought $3,105. (Photo by Colonial Acres)

“These sets are always desirable,” said Sandham. “When those came in on consignment, we were excited to put them in.”

Another highlight was Lot 760, a 1948 silver dollar in International Coin Certification Service (ICCS) Mint State (MS)-63. It brought $3,105.

“These ’48 dollars are always desirable, and MS-63 is a good grade. Its Trends value is $3,200, and it’s always amazing to see these coins sell at full Trends value,” said Sandham, who added nearly 140 people viewed the lot on iCollector.

Rounding out the coinage highlights was Lot 506, a 1904 25-cent piece in ICCS MS-62.

“That had beautiful toning – very natural – and once again, an Edward quarter in high grade is always tough to find. That was a great coin the buyer was able to get,” he said, adding the lot realized $2,443.75.

BANKNOTES

“Activity on all the high-end notes was strong,” said Sandham. “Overall, it was a very busy auction for us.”

This 1879 Eastern Township Bank $5 note (CH-230-14-04) in Very Good Plus condition brought $5,750. (Photo by Colonial Acres)

This 1879 Eastern Township Bank $5 note (CH-230-14-04) in Very Good Plus condition brought $5,750. (Photo by Colonial Acres)

Among the top banknote highlights was Lot 900, an 1879 Eastern Township Bank $5 note (Charlton 230-14-04) in Very Good Plus condition. It brought $5,750, which was the highest price paid at the Nov. 11-12 sale.

“That particular note doesn’t come around a lot, but it’s a really neat note,” he said. “With a note like this, it’s tough to tell what the market will bear, but it was a nice buy for someone to get a note that doesn’t come around too often.”

Another banknote highlight was Lot 1081, a 1954 Bank of Canada $1,000 banknote featuring the modified portrait (rather than the Devils Face variety) of Queen Elizabeth II (BC-44a). It was graded About Uncirculated-50 by Banknote Certification Service (BCS) and realized $2,875.

“It was tied for highest grade BCS has done on that signature combination,” said Sandham, who added it sold for a “good price.”

This 1954 Bank of Canada $1,000 banknote featuring the modified portrait of Queen Elizabeth II (BC-44a) sold for $2,875. (Photo by Colonial Acres)

This 1954 Bank of Canada $1,000 banknote featuring the modified portrait of Queen Elizabeth II (BC-44a) sold for $2,875. (Photo by Colonial Acres)

Another “strong price” was realized by Lot 1038, a 1937 Bank of Canada $20 note (BC-25a) in Professional Money Guaranty (PMG) Gem Uncirculated-65 EPQ (Exceptional Paper Quality). It sold for $2,702.50.

“That’s pretty well the highest grade you can find on that note,” said Sandham.

Rounding out the banknote highlights was Lot 944, an 1887 Series A $2 banknote issued by the Dominion of Canada (DC-11-i). In Very Good condition, this note sold for $2,530.

“A lot of those older Dominion notes are dying up and it’s harder to find,” he said. “Once again, there was strong bidding for this lot.

For more information, visit colonialacres.com.

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