New $2 coin launch set for today in B.C.

The Royal Canadian Mint is unveiling today a new circulating $2 coin, based on the iconic Canadian image of the Second World War, Wait for Me Daddy.

The picture, taken on Oct. 1, 1940, shows Warren “Whitey” Bernard, running to his father Jack, his mother Bernice trying to catch him back.

Jack Bernard’s regiment, the British Columbia Regiment, was leaving for an undisclosed location, after being mobilized for service in the Fourth Canadian Infantry Division. The photograph was shot by Claude Dettloff, a photographer for the Vancouver Province.

The photograph appeared in the Province the next day, and was picked up by newspapers and magazines around the world. The young lad became a celebrity, and spent six weeks touring British Columbia, appearing in bond drives.

The coin launch is part of a ceremony today which includes the unveiling of a sculpture based on the photograph, and a commemorative stamp from Canada Post.

Collectors able to attend the event, scheduled for 11 a.m PST at Hyack Square, Columbia and 8th St., New Westminster, can purchase stamps, or exchange an old toonie for a new one.

The Mint has embargoed the release of the new $2 coin until 4 p.m. today. Watch for it on www.canadiancoinnews.com.

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