Whitman Expo auction realizes more than $17.2 million

Stack’s Bowers Galleries has once again exceeded expectations with an exciting auction at the 2016 Whitman Coin and Collectibles Baltimore Expo, where the total prices realized topped $17.2 million ($13.5 million USD).

Held March 30-April 6, the sale saw part two of the Twin Leaf Collection of Middle and Late Date large cents open the bidding. Representatives from the esteemed firm said bidders responded “with vigor in the auction gallery, on the telephone, and over the Internet.”

Lot 10192 (Image provided by Stack's Bowers)

Lot 10192 sold for about $30,000. (Image provided by Stack’s Bowers)

The “masterfully assembled” Twin Leaf Collection included numerous gem coppers of 1816-1857, and in many instances with pedigrees dating back to the 19th century. Among the highlights of the Twin Leaf Collection was Lot 10192, a popular 1839/6 overdate graded by Professional Coin Grading Service (PCGS) as About Uncirculated (AU)-53. It brought about $30,000 ($23,500 USD).

On day two of the weeklong auction, a small but important grouping of exonumia – including numerous scarce Assay Commission medals; rare Hard Times tokens; and a pair of “desirable” Indian Peace medals – crossed the block.

Lot 12012 (Image provided by Stack's Bowers)

Lot 12012 realized about $25,500. (Image provided by Stack’s Bowers).

That afternoon, Lot 12012 came upon the auction block. The 1857 large-size silver James Buchanan Indian Peace medal realized about $25,500 ($19,975 USD) after excited bidding, which continued throughout much of the session.

Shortly after came Lot 12052, a 1945 bronze U.S. Assay Commission medal in MS-66 as graded by Numismatic Guaranty Corp. (NGC). With 30 Assay Commission medals offered in the sale, results were expected to be strong and excitement was evident in the auction room. Auctioneers said this lot – “one of the most attractive issues in the Assay Commission series” – had tremendous action from the opening bid until the final hammer fell, realizing about $14,250 ($11,162.50 USD).

Lot 13198 was one of several coins to hit the six-figure mark. (Image provided by Stack's Bowers)

Lot 13198 was one of several coins to hit the six-figure mark.

Later that evening, the Rarities Night Session offered “a seemingly endless run of world-class coins.” Several lots exceeded the six-figure mark, among them the finest-known 1799 eagle, a PCGS-graded Mint State (MS)-66. After strong bidding, the coin sold for about $630,000 ($493,500 USD).

OTHER HIGHLIGHTS

Other highlights include Lot 13156, an 1808 Capped Head Left quarter eagle in PCGS MS-61. This example of a classic U.S. type coin attracted plenty of attention, auctioneers said. When the hammer finally dropped, the final price – nearly $300,000 ($233,250 USD) – nearly doubled the pre-sale estimate.

Lot 13092, a 1795 Draped Bust silver dollar in PCGS MS-63-plus, crossed the block at about $150,000 ($117,500 USD). This popular type coin featured Choice MS quality and “undeniably beautiful toning,” auctioneers said.

Lot 13234, an 1876-S Liberty double eagle in MS-65 as graded by NGC, sold for about $120,000 ($94,000 USD). From the centennial year of the U.S., this impressive Type II double eagle is among only a small group of known gems for the issue.

For more details about the Whitman Coin and Collectibles Baltimore Expo auction, click here.

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