New Issue: £10 polymer note unveiled by Bank of Scotland

Last week, the Bank of Scotland unveiled its forthcoming £10 polymer banknote, which is slated to enter circulation later this year.

Sir Walter Scott remains on the note’s obverse while the Glenfinnan Viaduct remains on the reverse; however, for the first time, a steam train will be depicted atop the iconic viaduct, which was used as a location for several of the Harry Potter films. The train featured on the banknote is a Stanier “Black 5” steam locomotive.

“The new note retains our much loved design of Sir Walter Scott with the famous Glenfinnan Viaduct pictured on the back and we’ve evolved the design by introducing the popular heritage tourist train crossing the bridge,” said Bank of Scotland director Mike Moran.

The note obverse of the note features Sir Walter Scott as well as The Mount in Edinburgh. (Photo by Bank of Scotland)

“With polymer notes being cleaner, more secure, and more durable than paper notes, I’m sure our new £10 note will prove popular across Scotland.”

SEPTEMBER LAUNCH

The new £10 polymer note will be launched this September. The notes will be smaller than the existing paper banknotes, which will be gradually withdrawn after the new notes enter circulation.

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